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What are the Correct Replacement Bolts for mounting your Bicycle Kickstands? 3/8″ – 16 TPI BSW Whitworth

What are the Correct Replacement Bolts for mounting your Bicycle Kickstands? 3/8″ – 16 TPI BSW Whitworth

Replacement Bolts for mounting your Kickstands are most likely a 16G 3/8″ Whitworth 55 deg Thread with a nominal metric diameter of 9.525mm, so close enough to M10 x 1.5mm but not quite, you’ll probably have trouble getting it to start although it may bit a little it’ll jam if you really try it or just take off the first thread.

It’s the kind of bolt you want to do up nice and tight, often util the mounting plate flexes under the bolt head, around 20 N.m / 14-15 lbf.ft Torque

 

The Correct Bolt

3/8″ 16G Whitworth 55 deg, 2″ Long, HEX Bolt (14mm Spanner, not 9/16″) with a Full Thread, preferably BZP Bright Zinc Plated, or Stainless Steel

Major
diameter
Thread
pitch
Minor
diameter
75% tap
drill size
(in) (mm) (in−1) (mm) (in) (mm) (in) (mm)
3/8 9.525 16 1.588 0.2950 7.493 516 8.0
0.375 9.82 16.333 1.588 0.3212 8.16 2164 8.2

 

So where do you get one of these? It’s a rather obsolete, and unobtainable part as bolts go, it’s a hard find. It’s the kind of thing you’ll find in a large selection pack of bolts, if you’re lucky you’ll have one in with your M10 bolts or close to hand.

 

What if I can’t find the correct bolt?

What’s best to do if you can’t find this rather obsolete bolt, what if I can’t find the correct bolt? Well given it’s size that it’s very easy to tap if you’ve got a bolt and tap set, I’d recommend that.  It just so happens the hole size is a good fit for the ISO Metric M10 x 1.5mm Bolt Thread Tap being around 8.25mm ID it’s a fraction undersize, but use lots of cutting fluid and it’ll make a good thread. This doesn’t work if you’ve got a striped thread, or if ,maybe the hole on your Chainstay welded or brazed-on kickstand plate

There are of course taps & dies available if you’ve got a bolt with only a short section of thread, and you may find you can get away with a bolt 1/2″ shorter if you’ve got narrow gauge tubing as the 2″ tends to be a bit longer than required once fully installed, it does however make installation easier and slightly less fiddly having a 2″ bolt.

 

I’ve seen the topic covered on bike forums . net and after tapping a thread, then finding a couple of Full Thread 2″ x 3/8″ 16 BSW Bolts it made sense to make some sense of it all, as forums are full of small snippets and often lend off topic confusion to the matter. Old bikes are full of strange threads, and a lot of older threads are now hard to come by.
I hope you’ve found this useful, obviously there will be changes to the metric bolts already from many manufacturers and if you’re lucky you’ll never need to come across this article. I’ve just spent a bit of time writing up this article on the mundane topic of these bolts and if it gets enough hit’s and attention I’ll get in some bolts maybe, but it gives a good idea of how to work around the problem and should give enough info to explain everything you’ll give up looking for normally unless you wonder around with a bolt in your pocket or use thread gauges…

You can find our range of Kickstands here.

 

If of course as you are reading this in the modern times, things are mainly and almost exclusively made using more standardised metric threads, ISO Metric M10 x 1.5mm Bolt Full Threaded should do the trick for most stands, but you can’t always be right can you!

There’s always the good old reliable addition of Loctite, or a thread locking compound, and if you’ve gone down the route of tapping your threads out I’d recommend using some… If nothing else, it’ll make sure your hard work works for a long time yet.

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Alex’s Totally Affordable Vintage Road Bike Restoration Project. Part 1 – Finding something to restore

So Hi, I’m Alex and this is the start of a series of blog posts documenting the restoration of a vintage road bike, interspersed with pictures of my cat,she’s called CATFACE, this is her. (yes grumpy is her default expression)

 

Well first of all for this restoration project to get started I’m going to need a frame to restore. So “To eBay” I thought, where I sifted through countless frame and fork sets in various states of decay. Until eventually I came across this lovely little vintage frame covered in what looks like multiple layers of bad paint jobs. It was listed at £20 plus £10 p&p, which unlike a lot of the listings I looked at was p&p reflecting the actual cost of posting a frame! If you’re buying one yourself then really £15 is the absolute upper limit of what it should cost to send (assuming this is in the U.K.) this frame’s £10 p&p was reasonable . After a bit of back and forth negotiating we eventually agreed on £18 and he’ll throw in a seat post.

Below you can see the pictures from the listing. As you can probably tell it looks like it has a bit of a bent drop out, though nothing the awesome power of gas pliers can’t deal with! The forks also may or may not be a bit bent out of shape.

 

 

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BSA – Aligning Damaged Dropouts, Frame and Forks

Rear Dropout on the Drive Side had been opened up and the forks were also slightly twisted and the drop out was also opened up on one side.

We simply managed to close the gap in the dropout using extra large adjustable pliers, shielded with folded card to protect the metalwork (although to be honest at this stage there’s nothing to protect) we don’t want any gauge and scores or marks we want to file down any imperfections as we go.

The forks were easily pulled back into shape and balanced perfectly just using hand forces the forward leg was corrected and dropout closed up a touch on the one side.

Next stage, Sanding down…

Continue reading BSA – Aligning Damaged Dropouts, Frame and Forks

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BSA – Buying Parts, Cranks and Bar Tape

Cranks chosen on price, these came in just under £20 with a reasonable ratio to work well against 16 teeth at the rear simple and silver.

Square Taper Bottom Bracket required, I’ll have to wait until I can find something short enough to assemble it, this need something in the range of 68mm X 101mm. Yikes!

 

Grips, covered with Brown! Handlebar Tape… Cost £3.56 Bargain! China Strikes again…

Cheap as chips but it’ll do the job, and work well with British Racing Green for the frame colour.

Grip Tape