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Bafang BF1808H66200-1 36V 250W Rear Hub

Has your bike lost it’s Oomph, does it now feel like it does 0.0mph extra to your effort?

Do you know how your hub looks on the inside? You can’t tell what lurking in there from the outside…

Has your bike sat for a long time? Has somebody said it’s your battery but you don’t want to believe them?

Does it still make a noise like it want to move but doesn’t? This is your biggest clue maybe, how does it sound?

Did it stop working with no clues or did it give up whilst riding?
The later means you may have damaged something, the former is an indicator of this issue maybe, you see grease ages, it gets old and sticky and parts eventually stop moving, if they do so for long enough then you’ll end up with no drive if your clutch seizes open, or perhaps it’ll jam on and not release, you may hear the motor whir whilst you spin the wheel by hand if it’s still engaged.

The Customer phrased this as

“it just doesn’t do anything on full power, all the lights are on, but there’s no discernible difference between settings anymore, it just stopped working one day, maybe it hadn’t been used for a couple of months. The batteries charged and all the lights come on, but it’s useless on a hill!”

This had me stumped for a bit, but I had a hunch, the strange thing was I’d have assumed and tested further for electrical errors and faults except for the fact the hub made noises like it was still doing something… Just zero discernable torque added with pedal assist at it’s highest level, you could feel a little boost on the flat, but on a hill you’d get zero benefit.

So, what to check first, is it switched on, well yes of course, full battery indicator, all visibly operational, no damaged connectors or wires and some form of response from everything except the power output of the Hub in Assisted Drive modes.

So the strip down begins, the battery removed and voltage checked at 42V so that’s well charged, and looks like it’s not suffering, but I’ve not load tested it or worked out any internal resistance yet, I would almost instinctively think of this to be an issue, it seems odd that the battery level doesn’t drop on the indicator in use. We know therefore the charger also is good. The bike had been left standing in the shop whilst they tried and failed to fault find the issue, so a dud cell could be suspected, but that’s not it.

Hub internals removed, time for inspection…

The wheel has been rebuilt and installed with the axle cutout facing downwards which isn’t ideal, so I go to great lengths to check the continuity of the leads from the 9-pin Juliet Plug to the circuit board solder joints, which appear good, I’m more hesitant of the multimeter I’m using giving false negatives, but it doesn’t appear to be damaged. I’ve full disassembled the hub now and also have the planetary gears visible, these are in good shape although looking a little dry the grease is old and grey but it’s not the issue, it does point towards the age of the hub.

The gears are stuck on the axle shaft and I use a 3-arm puller to remove them along with the clutch, and loose the small woodruff key as I do (easily found, but watch out for it) the twirling and inspecting probably shifted it loose, so be careful as the clutch may float but still need persuading off the axle it gives enough space for it to fall out. Had I realised sooner I might have caught this quicker, but the clutch was off, at this point I’m still running blind, it didn’t function like a clutch should an I just span it and span it, one way then the other, nice and freely it span, little to no real resistance. I secretly knew this was a bit off, but as things were still covered in crap old grease and every part of this hub spins around itself rather freely it wasn’t as obvious to me until I caught a video of someone hacking one apart and I thought all of a sudden about that old grease again.

The sticky old grease in the clutch rollers was holding them back? Maybe, but that leaves one of two options of which either could end in failure, but worth a shot. It’s not an available spare, none of the internals strictly are, it’s sealed and riveted shut in production.
After some moderate cleaning and a blunt tickle it hadn’t got much better but had changed a bit, it got put down and I came back to it and low and behold it jammed on and wouldn’t release, once it released under much load, the was game on!
The second option would involve cutting it open, grinding off the rivets and possibly just riveting it back up afterwards, but I don’t favour the gear shafts staying put for too long, it may become an option next time.

Lot’s of GT85 and a little bit of “engine oil” later, it moves and lives, albeit sporadically operational, it does catch and release, not every time but it’s viable almost, when it grabs though it’d strip the gears so not good enough.
Next come out the big persuader and the flying anvil, oscillating almost syncopated blows on opposing sides whilst giving it a small degree of rotation slowly and then going back to working it round slowly, like checking a bearing for smoothness, or a freehub for engagement.

All of this working it free was done in the vice whilst it was mounted on an old 9mm axle using the cone nuts to centre it with a good clamping force. Using a bar between the planet gear pegs to free it up when stuck again success was judged in the torque required to release it again.

Did it work…

The hub was reassembled with new bearings in the disc / non-drive side and in the planet gears too and low and behold worked as desired first time back on the bike. Sounds good as new, or as good as it’s going to for a hub that’s probably done a good few miles now… Whilst everything looked in almost tip top condition once cleaned up to service it’s not got any noticeable wear except the bearing all feeling like they’d like to have failed a while ago.

Servicing is an important part of keeping your eBike running and we can help you do that, get in touch if you’d like to find out more.

Bike Summary

Bike: Halfords Carrera Crosscity E Folding Bike 250W

Hub Motor: Bafang BF1808H66200-1
Hub Motor Circuit Board:
Planetary Clutch Model: BF180704YA
26T-40T Reduction / 12mm Axle / 9.2mm x 72mm Case x 34mm Total depth / 3x 7.9mm x 20mm Planetary Gear Shafts running twin 688Z Bearings on 17.8mm of shaft.
Bearings (not including Cassette Body freewheel): 6001-2RS for Disc-side x1, 688zz x6 for Planetary Gears

Battery: Reention Rapier IR-III
Li-Ion 36v / 8.7AH / 313.2Wh
GJ-BY36-8K7KPX-01
DBSFSDBY36V8.7AHP180920243

Spares

Spare Parts available through Halfords, although supply may be currently limited the products you may need are available as;

Spare Battery Product Code: 321489 – £300
Spare Speed Controller: Model Year Variants possible; 321885 Battery Controller Unit – £50
Torque Sensor: 299468 – £15
Spare Wheel: 321406 – £150
Handlebar control: 299500 – £25

The Batteries are also offered by a third party on ebay based out of Bristol with a 10.5Ah Upgrade for £359 link here

Fitted to a Carrera Crosscity E Folding Bicycle, it’s built into a 20″ Rear Wheel, powered by a Reention Battery which is honestly worth getting upgraded if it’s the problem unless you really want to avoid the small weight penalty for the gained range.

Some useful videos on similar hubs

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What goes into your bike when it’s “Serviced”…

Here’s a bike that looked a little worse for wear, it wasn’t very old or very used, just neglected and very poorly built and adjusted from when it was new. Here’s how it’s looked before work started, lost of rust and a chain that’s solid! The Freewheel looks worse than it is actually, everything moves except the cables look like they shouldn’t they do a little, it’s got a bit of promise!

Challenge Sceptre 24" 18 Speed Dual Suspension Mountain Bike Blue 16"
Challenge Sceptre 24″ 18 Speed Dual Suspension Mountain Bike Blue 16″

Why choose this bike, for the purposes of this article, well it was simple, it’s getting a lot of hits! So it seemed like simple exposure, if you are thinking of buying this bike you’re in for a little treat as the labour alone would normally cost you more than this bike would brand new…
As the level of work and parts count goes up so will the price, so here’s some of what you can expect now it’s going to be serviced it’s basically being stripped to component form and rebuilt.

Maybe the wheel’s got pinched for another bike too, so we’re rebuilding them with some bits left around, it’s getting the works treatment, or at least a lot more than it was going to originally. Seeing as the wheels are apart, the freewheels removed, it’s time to give everything a clean.

Dismantled Freewheel
Dismantled Freewheel with two cogs and freehub already cleaned up.

Watch this space to find out how the cranks turned out, the shock spring was pretty orange too, and I’ll show you the secret hidden under the rusty chain and why it’s always worth having a look and checking a bike over before you ride off on it.

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Saturday 20: Brent BMX Club, Dr Bike and Sunday 21 June: ELBO BMX Club

Hello Guys & Girls,

We’re sorry to have to announce neither Alex nor myself will be at Brent BMX Club,  this weekend. I’m off to Lundy Island for a few days, maybe a spot of diving, canoeing…
It’s a rare occasion I get a Holiday

It also seems weather wasn’t going to be on our side any how with rain predicted all day

We will be back in action Saturday week 27th June , with our usual support from 1-3pm on Saturday Afternoon.

Alternately for those interested a national BMX race is happening on Saturday.

I hope you all have a lovely weekend and I’ll see you again in a weeks time.

Kit

 

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Dr Bike – Booking a Mechanic to come to you…

Dr Bike – Booking a Mechanic to come to you…

Many people refer to this service as Dr Bike but we offer more than just a simple bike health check, PDI or MOT if you’d like to think of it as that. Alongside a full safety inspection we will do minor repairs, adjustments, adapt your bike to suit you and advise you on how to look after your own bike to keep you running smoothly.

To book a experienced mechanic to come to your organisation or find out more about them, call 07771745110 or email kit@getmefixed.co.uk

What are the benefits

Bike health checks and minor repairs are a great way of attracting people to any event. Getting bikes in good condition is a great way to get people cycling for leisure or commuting. It’s amazing how many bikes sit in people’s shed that just need a quick tune-up to get them roadworthy again

As well as fixing up bikes our mechanics will explain how to keep bikes maintained and working. It’s amazing how many bikes on the road aren’t properly maintained, which is why these services are so popular.

Our professional mechanic arrives at your workplace or event fully equipped, and effortlessly fixes as many bikes as they can in the time provided, making sure everyone goes home happier and safer.

Why use us?

We’ve been running maintenance courses across for some time now, and in the industry for over a decade, and know just how confusing mechanics can be to the uninitiated.

We use all our experience to make sure our courses are clear, educational and fun. We already work with schools, bike clubs, businesses, charities, local councils all across London.

What do we provide?

Everything! You just give us a time and a location, and mechanic will be there.

Bikes can either be dropped off and left for the mechanic to work on or the mechanic can spend around 10 minutes with each client, adjusting their bike’s brakes and gears to make sure their bike runs super smoothly.

In the course of the ‘examination’, they give every bike an effective safety check and can also offer impartial advice if they spot more serious problems.

Typically a mechanic will, if necessary:

  • adjust and clean brakes and gears
  • replace brake cables and blocks
  • replace gear cables
  • clean and lubricate
  • check and inflate tyres
  • check headset and bottom bracket for play
  • replace missing bar and cable ends
  • advise on any further work that is needed

All spares listed above are included in the price. If further work is needed the mechanic will advise on the problem and what to ask for in a bike shop.

Want to Learn as well?

Our professional Mechanics can teach groups in your organisation about how a bike works and how to keep it in good shape. This activity is often run alongside a bike check session, bike club, events (although they can be booked independently) and can be tailored to your organisation. At workplaces these sessions are often referred to as a ‘lunchtime maintenance class’.

How much does it all cost?

Hiring a professional GetMeFixed bike mechanic costs £75 per hour with a minimum booking of three hours (for approximately 12-14 bike checks).  If you want more than one mechanic, we offer a discounted rate for the second (or more) mechanic: £55 per hour.

GMF offers discounted rates for community groups and schools, please get in touch to discuss how we can help your community event.

We can also link you up with our local cycling groups and community projects in your area who may be able to support your event.

 

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Tacx PC & Trainer Set Up for you

Tacx Trainers – Set Up & Ready to Ride

Ever had the infuriation of trying to assemble Ikea Furniture or other flat pack options, or just don’t fancy sitting through the installation process or optimising your current set up for use with your new Tacx Turbo Trainer?

Well you can leave all this to us if you want.

Purchase your hassel free Set Up

Now for £50 in the London Area





The picture above is a twin rig being set up with the newest software for Bromely Council in connection with Big Foot Bikes as also pictured below in action.

The above article was featured in the;

London Cyclist

August September Issue 2010

Unfortunately this does not feature in their archives, but this is a free magazine to members and contains lots of useful information for cycling in the capital.