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Listings, the Before and After: Cleaning & Servicing

Bike servicing made easy, looks simple doesn’t it… So why does it more often than not look like this…

Do you have a cloth and a can of oil? Got an old tooth brush, better a brass one though!

Cleaning goes a long way to making a bike rideable and pleasantly doing so, but a dirty bike falls short and grinds it’s way around lacking in stopping power and pulling efficiency too, you’ll put more power in to move a dirty bike. Over zelouly using a Hose or Jetwash will only aid corrosions access to those impossible to see areas inside your bearings driving in dirt whilst it washes out your grease.

Before… (or as listed)

We quite often list bikes on ebay and our website before we’ve even done more than a cursey clean, sometimes not even that and this is one of those examples.

Here’s a list of typical faux pas of your Halfords Apollo specials, this also applies to most bikes built from a box at home, this is only going of whats in front of me with this bike so it’s not comprehensive but actually quite minimal.

  • No Grease used, so a rusty seatpost / stem and pedals that would’ve either rusted in place but most likely fallen out as loose…
  • Loose B/B & Headset bearings, these are not fully adjusted often from the factory and also require bedding in (ergo your 6 week service)…
  • Stiff Brakes due to low manufacturing tolerances and corrosion due to no grease!
  • Little to no oil on the chain, it’s got nothing left of the factory oil.

This one sold locally so we treated it to the service it doesn’t deserve, and just started with a wire brush, slowly addressing the debris, dirt and corrosion goes a long way we came across most problems you’ll regularly see above, the adjustments in all honesty were not as bad as they could be.

After Servicing

Find out about our service prices here

Servicing starts with a good clean and that’s half the battle with bikes, they’ve got so many angles dirt can get in and stop everything running smoothly, now it’s looking good it runs better too.
Knocking noises dealt with in simple adjustments, and stiff brakes aided with modifications to the finish, the bike’s sounding solid again like it should do.

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Alex’s Totally Affordable Vintage Road Bike Restoration Project. Part 1 – Finding something to restore

So Hi, I’m Alex and this is the start of a series of blog posts documenting the restoration of a vintage road bike, interspersed with pictures of my cat,she’s called CATFACE, this is her. (yes grumpy is her default expression)

 

Well first of all for this restoration project to get started I’m going to need a frame to restore. So “To eBay” I thought, where I sifted through countless frame and fork sets in various states of decay. Until eventually I came across this lovely little vintage frame covered in what looks like multiple layers of bad paint jobs. It was listed at £20 plus £10 p&p, which unlike a lot of the listings I looked at was p&p reflecting the actual cost of posting a frame! If you’re buying one yourself then really £15 is the absolute upper limit of what it should cost to send (assuming this is in the U.K.) this frame’s £10 p&p was reasonable . After a bit of back and forth negotiating we eventually agreed on £18 and he’ll throw in a seat post.

Below you can see the pictures from the listing. As you can probably tell it looks like it has a bit of a bent drop out, though nothing the awesome power of gas pliers can’t deal with! The forks also may or may not be a bit bent out of shape.

 

 

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BSA – Aligning Damaged Dropouts, Frame and Forks

Rear Dropout on the Drive Side had been opened up and the forks were also slightly twisted and the drop out was also opened up on one side.

We simply managed to close the gap in the dropout using extra large adjustable pliers, shielded with folded card to protect the metalwork (although to be honest at this stage there’s nothing to protect) we don’t want any gauge and scores or marks we want to file down any imperfections as we go.

The forks were easily pulled back into shape and balanced perfectly just using hand forces the forward leg was corrected and dropout closed up a touch on the one side.

Next stage, Sanding down…

Continue reading BSA – Aligning Damaged Dropouts, Frame and Forks

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BSA – Buying Parts, Cranks and Bar Tape

Cranks chosen on price, these came in just under £20 with a reasonable ratio to work well against 16 teeth at the rear simple and silver.

Square Taper Bottom Bracket required, I’ll have to wait until I can find something short enough to assemble it, this need something in the range of 68mm X 101mm. Yikes!

 

Grips, covered with Brown! Handlebar Tape… Cost £3.56 Bargain! China Strikes again…

Cheap as chips but it’ll do the job, and work well with British Racing Green for the frame colour.

Grip Tape